Virtual Selling In The Age Of Coronavirus

Face-to-face sales are no longer an option during the coronavirus epidemic

Businesses across the country suddenly face uncertainty now that the majority of the workforce is required to work from home.

If your business is used to thriving in a face-to-face environment, how can you pivot to a digital sales model at such short notice?

While there are certain to be barriers and stumbling blocks along the way, we believe that such a transition is possible — and that it can make your business more healthy in the long run — provided you approach it with the right mindset.

1. My salespeople aren’t meeting with prospects face-to-face anymore. How can we adapt?

For companies who hadn’t brought digital into their sales process with virtual selling, putting the right technological foundation in place is essential so that you can communicate with each other and with clients, all while organizing, recording, and protecting your data.

Solution: You need to get certain virtual tools in place as soon as possible.

The good news is that many tools have free and trial versions — and a bevy of tech support options available for those just getting started.

Free tools like Skype, FaceTime, or Google Hangouts might work just fine. Other more robust conferencing solutions like Zoom, Join.Me, and Microsoft Teams are designed for business.

Start by using a platform internally so you can work out the kinks before a client call. Watch online tutorials to help you troubleshoot.

Pro tip: Zoom is nearly industry-standard at this point — enough so that The New York Times published the headline We live in Zoom now late last week. Zoom has a free version to get you started, but there are some limitations (like having a 40 minute meeting maximum for groups larger than two).

2. My sales team is older and not very tech-friendly. What can I do to help them adjust?

The learning curve for technology can appear steep, but it is often people’s insecurities that are the biggest inhibitor. The last thing you want to do is keep your workers in the dark, taking too long to put solutions in place.

Solution: Communicate that you’re going to do everything in your power to make this digital transition quick and smooth. Give them a date by which the plan will be rolled out, and make sure to include mandatory training sessions when you announce any new tool.

Encourage your most enthusiastic, respected team members to participate in the tool selection and the planning for training. They can be your cheerleader and even help support others on the team.

Pro tip: Make a recording of the training available to your team members after the session is over so that they can refer back to it.

Use video so there is a visual component to look back on, and even open up a hotline or support ticket line where sales reps can ask questions and get answers they need to use the tools effectively.

3. With my staff working remotely, how will I know if they’re productive or not?

If you’re used to seeing your colleagues work each day at their desks, an abrupt switch to remote work can feel like a loss of control. After all, how can you be sure that they’re doing all they can?

Solution: As this is a stressful time, don’t make the mistake of hounding your employees. Remember, they’re adjusting too. And, if they are your coworkers, you likely trust them and value their professionalism.

If you have a task management platform or a CRM, all of the information that you need should be at your fingertips.

We often hear that customers’ sales teams use a CRM but that leadership doesn’t know how to determine if the activities they’re logging are effective, or turn into revenue.

To gain the visibility you need to understand how effective your team is, check out this HubSpot knowledge base article to help get you started building the reports you need.

Pro tip: As a part of your training sessions, you should also have a playbook that details exactly what activities you want your team to log and how they should do so.

Of course, sales reps are still responsible for reaching KPI goals while working from home — although these might be adjusted due to external circumstances.

4. My business is brick and mortar and customers are afraid to walk in the doors — or we have been forced to close altogether

The beauty of digital sales is that it allows your brick and mortar location to be only one facet of your business. A generation ago, if a storefront closed, the business folded.

Today, the shopping world is increasingly shifting to online commerce. According to Oberlo, “in 2020, e-commerce sales are expected to account for 15.5% of retail sales worldwide,” up from about 7% five years ago.

Solution: Of course, this depends on your business. If you’re looking to launch an e-commerce platform, there are many solutions.

Or, if you use your physical location for sales meetings, turn that former in-store appointment into a virtual in-home appointment. You can set up a scheduling tool on your website and allow customers to set up virtual appointments online.

When it comes time for the appointment, both the salesperson and the consumer will join the video call, and the salesperson can conduct their meeting as they normally would.

Your sales team can encourage contacts to use the scheduling tool, either by calling them or emailing them to help you generate demand.

You can also run digital ads to drive traffic to your appointment scheduler and generate additional demand. As long as electronic payments and shipping can get the consumer their product, you should still see the fruits of adapting quickly and helping consumers get the products they still need.

Also, if your hours have changed, don’t forget to update your Google My Business profile so that customers know how and when they can find you.

Pro tip:  Think about what you might ask the prospect to do before they show up for the virtual appointment. Do you have a video that you could send them so they are more educated about your sales process or your product before the virtual meeting?

Doing so can help you shorten your meeting time and open up your calendar to conduct more appointments.

5. A big portion of our revenue came from in-person events and tradeshows. Now what?

Companies often spend heavily to be represented at trade shows and other events. But don’t panic. Remember, no one is attending these events right now. You’re not missing out on opportunities. These opportunities currently don’t exist.

You’ll still be able to reach qualified buyers, and you won’t spend as much to do so.

Solution:  It’s likely that you’ve been given advice over the years to reallocate your tradeshow budget to digital or inbound marketing.

When you meet with prospective customers at tradeshows, they typically want to know things like “What problem does your product solve,” “How does that compare to your competitors,” or “How much does it cost?”

Now, people will still be searching for these same answers, but they’ll be searching for them online. You’ll want to be the most trusted resource for answers they can find on the internet. All you need to do is write down the answers to these questions and publish them. It’s that simple.

Pro tip: Once people are on your website, they’ll be hungry for more information. Video will get them to convert at a much higher rate than text alone. Here are a bunch of stats to reference about the efficacy of video, but my personal favorites are these:

  • Marketers who use video grow revenue 49% faster than non-video users
  • Video drives organic 157% more traffic from search engine results pages
  • The average conversion rate for websites using video is 4.8%, compared to 2.9% for those that don’t use video

6. We don’t know the best way to communicate with our customers and prospects right now

These are unprecedented times, and it’s not always clear the best way to address what’s happening. It’s important to address the elephant in the room, but you need to do it right.

Solution:  Be empathic. Set up a time to talk with them, human to human. Listen to their problems and challenges and be the best resource that you can be. Try to accommodate them as much as possible because, when this pandemic turns around, the relationships you’ve built will help your business regain its footing.

If you learn that a customer is struggling and you have another customer that has experience in their particular situation, connect them. Hold a town hall-style meeting, a safe and open space for all of your clients to connect with your leadership and all company employees.

On your website, in emails, and on social media, keep your messaging consistent. Show empathy, but underscore the fact that business goes on and you are there to help your customers succeed.

Pro tip: Get ahead of your receivables, but with kindness and empathy. Do not hide behind email to collect payments or harass customers.

If you have an invoice coming due with a particular customer that has been impacted severely by the pandemic, call that customer or send them a video message so they can see your face, then do your best to help.

Managing the shift to digital

First, embrace the messy. Any abrupt transition is going to be tough. Work hard, knowing that everything will not be perfect the first time you host a video call, for example.

That’s okay.

Embrace the messy and learn from each experience. You will get better. But if you spend too much time trying to make things perfect before you get started, you’ll never move forward.

Second, live in the solution. In trying times, it’s easy to look back and think of how you could have handled things differently. With COVID-19, there was not much most businesses could have done. Regardless, focus your energy on the solution.

You can’t change yesterday. What can you do today, tomorrow, and next week?

The COVID pandemic has changed the world of business. If you spend the time waiting for normalcy to return, there’s a chance you might not survive. Smart businesses are diving into digital solutions, knowing they might not get it all right at first.

 

Call to learn more 

Chat Now

Follow Us

linkedinfacebook 

 

 

Source: https://www.impactbnd.com/blog/virtual-selling-coronavirus-questions-sales

How do I work from home? Tips from the experienced

Most people spend months getting into the rhythm of remote work

Many Americans are trying to get that rhythm down with day’s notice. COVID-19 has made it to nearly every state including Alabama. With at least 28 confirmed cases (as of midday March 16) in Sweet Home Alabama, some businesses are telling their employees to stay home and avoid contact with the outside world as much as possible.

“It’s a big adjustment to start working from home,” said Tyler Reeves, a financial planner based in Birmingham. Reeves runs a one-man-show and has been working from his home office for a little over three years. First things first, he said, “dampen your expectations.” Working from home isn’t something you master in a day, he said.

“It is going to take a lot to get used to this,” Reeves said. “Give yourself some slack, and realize that these aren’t normal times.”

There are steps one can take to feel a little more “normal,” he said.

 

Find a routine

If you don’t work past 5 p.m. normally, said Kevin DeLeon, a web developer working remotely in Mobile, don’t pass that point when you’re at home. If you don’t work earlier than 8 a.m., don’t start that early from your bed.

Using the time you’d spend commuting, DeLeon said, to accomplish a personal goal, make breakfast or take a walk with your dog will get your day started on a better mental note.

“Office life gives you a forced schedule that you have to follow,” he said. “Form good habits early on and develop a routine.”

And developing a routine is important when trying to avoid feelings of guilt, he said. It’s easy to get locked in because you want your company to know you are putting in the work, he said but discussing trust and making others aware of your schedule can prevent harsh thoughts like, “Am I doing enough?”

Tarah Keech, coach and founder of Burnout Survival, suggests blocking out time for lunch or breaks on a public and personal calendar.

 

Listen to your mind and body

Blocking time out for yourself is crucial, Keech said. “You’ll be amazed at all you can do from home.” Letting the “new normal” sink in, she said, and taking breaks when you need them will better your performance.

DeLeon likes to step out on his back deck for a breath of fresh air, take 15 minutes to jog in place, do stretches or pick up the guitar in between jobs to refresh.

During these times, Keech said, mute your devices and go offline if you need a moment away from work. Simply getting up and walking around will help pass the day. In addition to physical activities, make sure you are eating regularly and drinking water, Reeves said.

“I know people who started working from home and didn’t realize they were eating more or less or not drinking enough water or spending too much time sitting,” he said. “Anything you can do to get outside and not just sit in front of the computer for eight hours straight will make this a better experience.”

 

 

Stay connected

And your co-workers can help a good bit with that too.

And if you don’t have a built-in work network, create your own for the time being. Reeves, who owns and runs his business alone, is a part of a financial planning organization and the group hosts video chats to see how people are doing, what they are going through and more.

Switching from emails to calls and calls to video chats is a brilliant way to kill some of the isolation, Keech said. “Connect on platforms and chats that you already love,” she said.

And if DeLeon can make it work from Mobile, Alabama, with co-workers on both coasts in New York and California, he said, we can make it work for the time being as a community.

 

Create a dedicated workspace

But, making it work involves more than a connection. Finding a place to do your best work is important, Reeves said. Setting up wherever you feel comfortable and focused will better your at-home work experience.

Whether that be at the kitchen table, on a couch, at a desk or on the floor somewhere, find a place that you can make your own, Keech recommends.

Julie Kenney, owner and designer at Inspired Closets Mobile, suggests finding a place that is quiet for phone calls and when the work is done, “close the door.”

And finding that place might be difficult for parents who have their children at home, Kenney said, but letting them help you draft a schedule for them can give parents the time they need to get work done.

Stay positive, take advantage of being at home while you can

There are probably tons of projects that have been put off, and now you have nothing but time at home to complete them.

Kenney, whose business specializes in helping people get organized, recommends cleaning and sorting drawers with the kids, going through closets and sorting to donate, working in the yard, painting a bedroom or organizing family photos.

Planning during the weekend or after 5 p.m. for the next day can keep you busy, she said. “Review what’s in your freezer, pantry and fridge,” she said. “Toss out any old, expired food that may be taking up space, and create a shopping list that can be available for a couple of weeks.”

Clean out your medicine cabinet, and make sure you have the basics on-hand if anyone gets sick, she said.

In the end, “how we think about what we think about will change our view,” Keech said. “If you have been unhappy in your career or job, this is an opportunity to show up and be who you want to be,” she said. “Think of ways you can be 110% from home.”

Follow Us

linkedinfacebook 

88% of Sales Calls Are Useless – Here’s Why….

Customer indecision is severely reducing the effectiveness of the sales operation

There’s a stark truth every business that depends on sales growth needs to take on board. According to Forrester research, around 88% of sales calls are viewed by customers as being ineffective; i.e. they add no value at all to the customer’s life. Paying anyone to succeed only 12% of their time at work in any role is a terrifying thought. But when that pitiful strike rate applies to the very engine of the company’s growth – sales – it’s enough to leave the most seasoned business leader screaming!

The situation may be tough. But at least there are no mysteries surrounding this level of failure. The customers surveyed by Forrester confirmed they don’t respond to that mighty 88% of sales calls because there’s nothing in it for them when they do. It’s just more noise and more stuff –“cognitive overload” if you want a technical term.

The people making the calls are unable to communicate the full value – or any real value – of their sales message. They often don’t know enough about their industry, their market and their solution to be convincing. And when you know less about what you’re selling than the guy you’re trying to sell it to knows, it’s a fair bet that you’re in trouble.

What Other Operational Area of YOUR Business Would Accept a 12% Success Rate?

Of course, there are organizations that would regard a 12% success rate as adequate. Successful even. They would see themselves as keeping pace with competitors. Maybe even outpacing them. So that’s ok? Well sorry, but no it isn’t ok. Not if you want to create a profitable organization, fueled by vigorous sales-led growth. Drill down into the successes – those times you do get through and have your message listened to by a customer. Even in that situation of viable opportunity, you’re likely losing out around 76% of the time. How so?

Credible data suggests that 16% of sales lost will be to competitors. Again, you might think it perfectly ok to retain well over 80% of your closable sales. That looks like a home run … until you dig deeper. Competitors leave you with four-fifths of the potential pie. But it’s not your commercial rivals who are eating your cheese (and whatever other filling you have in your pie). The culprit isn’t an honorable foe in a clean fought battle. It’s the miserable, skulking, creeping fog that is customer indecision.

 

Customer Indecision – Accounting for a Pretty Decisive 60% of Lost Sales

Indecision accounts for around 60% of lost sales. Customers take an age to make their minds up. Somewhere along the way, the love and enthusiasm die. And you lose out. What are the reasons for this very undesirable situation? And what can you do to improve it?

Start with a deep realization: there is no advantage to you in letting customer indecision creep in and take root. You need to stand out fast. You need to stand out enough to trigger a decision – even if that decision goes against you. And you either need to make the sale or make your way out of the situation and on to the next opportunity. The long sales cycle never makes you a winner. Take a hard look at your current pipeline. If it is clogged with sluggish, wannabe deals that are not really going anywhere, examine the root causes and take action.

Effective action depends on making a second realization. Most customers are “indecisive” for a small number of important reasons. The key driver is commoditization. Customers do not see what you are offering as being different in any significant way. They could find it somewhere else, with at least a couple of viable alternatives and maybe dozens, or even hundreds, of other choices. And the first rule with any commodity is that you always buy it for the lowest price, not top dollar.

 

Can You EVER Win a Race to the Bottom on Costs?

Buying for lowest price means a race to the bottom for your costs, your margins and any prospect of a decent profit. You can only win this game if your whole operation is configured around delivering the lowest price and you know you can work on wafer-thin margins. BUT … If you need to make the best profit you can on the most sales you can achieve, you literally cannot afford the luxury of a bunch of “indecisive” customers. And you must, therefore, wake up and get real.

Think of the commoditized market as a Roman gladiator arena. You and your fellow combatants are out there on the sand under the burning sun. You’re the ones sweating and straining. Literally giving your life’s blood. In the end only one of you can win. Along the way, you’re providing entertainment for a bunch of guys sitting in the shade, in no hurry to put their thumbs up or down, as long as the show continues. Unlike a real gladiator, fortunately, you have the chance to walk away. So do that. Leave the arena. Work on some new moves. How?

Don’t be afraid to look very rationally – critically – at what you’re selling. If it is a commodity, re-configure to make the sale on a new basis: price led, fast, no prisoners. Thumbs up or down in a quick clean fight. If however you truly believe that your offer is stand-out, that it deserves real, focused, positive customer attention that leads to winning the business, then equip yourself to be a winner.

 

Get Yourself Some Lethal Weapons

Your new sales armory will include three lethal weapons:

1. Make Your Offer A “Must Have” Some estimates say that we are faced with around 35 thousand decisions a day. Even if the figure is closer to 350 or 35, that’s still a lot of decisions. So, clarify and tighten your offer. Strip out the “cognitive overload” and make choosing you – quickly and decisively – a no-brainer for your customers.

2. Make Your Sales Team Make Sense Become certain, through message clarification, training, and real understanding, that every time one of your salespeople makes a sales call, they will add value to the customer, drive a positive decision and eliminate indecision.

3. If You Don’t Win, Don’t Lose Out In The Sales Process Stop confusing activity with achievement. As soon as it becomes clear that your “customer” is just playing you, disengage. Cut your losses and move on. It’s a certainty that you will save resources and protect your credibility. It’s not impossible that some of those “indecisive” customers will quickly realize that you are exactly the kind of confident, successful and determined supplier they need.

 

 Click Here to schedule a complimentary consultation

Call to learn more 

Chat Now

Follow Us

linkedinfacebook 

 

 

Source: www.revenuepathgroup.com

The Problem With Relationship-Based Sales

A business development consultant told me that 80% of new commissions come through relationships.

I don’t want to discount relationships. They’re important to us on a number of levels and a good portion of your work probably does come to you through some sort of relationship.

As a business development strategy though, you need to understand that things are changing.

First problem with relationships: They go away
It used to be that if you had a good relationship with the right person, all that client’s work flowed your way. In fact, when I was still working in architecture firms, I had a client who made all the facilities decisions for an extremely active and well-funded local organization. For almost 20 years he funneled all that organization’s work to us. Then he retired.

Your relationships are with human beings. They retire, change jobs, get promoted to different positions, basically experience some sort of change that makes that business development relationship less valuable to you. The relationships effectively go away.

Second problem with relationships: They’re just one person
It used to be that if you had a relationship with the right person, you could count on them to award the client’s or the prospect’s work to you. Today, decision making teams are getting bigger. There’s rarely one decision-maker. In fact, the average selection committee today is at least 6 people.

It’s not enough to have a relationship with one person. Now that your oldest, best client has a selection committee, your relationship with the Vice President isn’t enough. Your track record working with that client isn’t enough. There are 5 other people on the selection committee and that means that everyone you’re competing against may have a relationship with someone on the committee. In a simple vote, your relationship with one person on an ever-expanding selection committee loses.

Third problem with relationships: They make us lazy
Back when you had that relationship with the ultimate decision-maker, you could rely on them to advocate for you. They knew you, they’d worked with you, they trusted you and that was probably enough. Today, they’re not the ultimate decision-maker anymore and you haven’t equipped them with the tools they need to persuade the rest of the committee on your behalf.

Relationships are based on trust. In a one-to-one context that trust is usually built on experience over time. You don’t have that time anymore. Today, your clients and prospects learn about 70% of what they want to know about you before you even know they’re interested. What’s worse, you’re trying to gain the trust of a committee instead of the one person you’ve known for years. You can’t sit back and rely on that relationship to go in and carry the room. In a multiple-decision-maker world, where your prospects think you and all your competition looks the same, sounds the same and acts the same, you have to make yourself the clear choice and gain fast trust.

It’s up to you.
Keep building relationships. That still has to be part of your business development strategy. But go in with your eyes wide open. There are three keys to making the most of your business development relationships:

Have a clear message.
You need to clearly state what your convincing advantages are … the reasons why your prospects should choose you. Those advantages have to be clear enough (and stated enough) that those advocating relationships can repeat them just as easily as you can.

It’s not about you.
As experienced and qualified as you are, the decision-makers and selection committees are only interested in the firm that addresses their pains, threats, and fears. In order to gain fast trust, you have to demonstrate that you understand what’s keeping your prospects up at night and make your messaging all about them.

Have a conversation.
What it takes to get in the room is not the same as what it takes to win the room. That old-school relationship may have gotten you to the short-list interview, but now you’re in a room with 5 other people sitting, arms-crossed wondering why they should pick you.

You don’t know them; they don’t know you. Remember when you first met that person that’s now “your relationship”? It started with a conversation. Don’t talk about yourself like everyone else does. Win the room, and the project, by starting a conversation with them, about them. They’ll feel like you understand them, you’ll build fast-trust, and you’ll differentiate yourself from your competition.

Are you relying on old-school relationships or building fast-trust that differentiates your firm and makes you the clear choice for the right projects and the right fees?

Ask us about driving more revenue

Call to learn more

Chat Now

Follow Us

linkedinfacebook 

 

Source: https://blog.revenuepathgroup.com/blog/three-problems-with-relationship-based-business-development

Reputation Management – Who cares?

We have all heard about Reputation Management, and we know that it is a critical aspect of your business’s online and live profile… now let’s understand why.

Here’s an example that many of us can relate to. Imagine that you are thinking of going to a movie. If you are like a lot of people, you will probably first get online and look at all the movies that are playing and their reviews. Are you going to go to the movie that has awesome reviews, or the one that people say is a disappointment? Although a tremendous online review is good for a new movie, does it matter for you, the business looking to grow?

It isn’t news that businesses rely on the internet to research for the best product or service available to them. To get the best deal and the best product, people will use social media, review sites, even competitors’ websites. With everything out there, businesses need every advantage that they can get – – and they need to avoid potential catastrophes that could easily result from even one bad review.

Understanding reputation management can be vital for advancing your business – especially in a digital world where one negative online search result can be the difference between closing that deal or losing that revenue to a competitor.

When your online reputation really counts

Although your online reputation matters 24/7, there are some times when it seems to play a more critical role than others. Some real-world examples of when a good reputation really matters…

  • Closing a Deal

  • A Prospect is Doing Comparison Shopping

  • Potential Customers Searching for Online Reviews of Your Business

  • Selling Your Business

  • Networking

What is Reputation Management?

Before going too far down the reputation rabbit hole, we should outline a basic definition of what reputation management is. A basic description would be that reputation management is managing your reputation. But in reality, it is much more than that. Not only is reputation management managing your reputation by monitoring both the good and bad associated with your business online, but it is also being able to do something about those good and bad comments, reviews, etc.

How you monitor your online reputation

There are currently many different ways that you can monitor your online reputation. From apps to management companies, there are solutions to fit any size business. Knowledge is power so find a solution that works for you and move forward!

 

Ask us about our new Online Reputation Management

Call to learn more

Chat Now

Follow Us

linkedinfacebook 

 

How to Create a Sales Pitch That Closes More Deals

You’ve made it to the shortlist and now it’s time for the final presentation to a room full of decision-makers. But, the real decision-maker in the room is not a person.

You’re really selling to a 3-pound organ called the human brain. And as complex and amazing as it is, the process it uses to make a decision is both primitive and predictable.

When it comes to decision-making, there are two basic parts, and they can be categorized as either an influencer or the judge. You might be surprised to learn that neither logic nor emotion are the judge. They’re influencers, offering support for really big decisions, some of the time. The real judge is the “instinctual” part of the brain, the limbic part. Its everyday job is to eliminate threats, pains, and fears.

What’s amazing is that about 90% of our daily choices only happen in this part of the brain. They’re the sort of things we do all the time, like braking when a light turns red, tying a shoelace that’s come undone, or avoiding a hornet flying near you. For the other 10%, the limbic part of the brain makes its move first, and then logic and emotion come in as backup support. You can’t avoid it; every human decision, including whether or not to buy from you, begins with an assessment of threats, pains and fears.

 

What We Know About the Brain

Process – Most salespeople present in a way that conflicts with our brain’s decision-making process, citing facts and figures and features and benefits. As hard as it might seem, you need to flip it upside down and talk about pains, threats, and fears first.

Speed – With 90% of the decision made on autopilot, you must make it easy and fast for your prospects to say “that’s it!”.

Emotion – You must create an emotional lift to spark commitment. Emotions are the trigger to decisions.

So, How Do I Present to the Brain?

 

#1 – Develop Your Three Convincing Why’s

Find the two or three ways you solve your prospect’s pain. Prove them over and over and you create alignment with your prospect’s entire team, each member able to remember and recite how you’re different and why they should buy. Those two or three reasons answer “Why should they do business with you?” We call them Convincing Advantages™.

Well-crafted advantages that are unique to you, focused on your prospect’s pain and relentlessly proven, make it easy to communicate, easy to remember, and easy to apply – along every step of the sale.

 

#2 – Stop Talking About Yourself

“We have over 100 years combined experience on our team…”

“We’ve been a local resource for two decades….”

“We are trusted by over 10 of the Fortune 500…”

Do not start your presentation by talking about yourself. The brain does not care you are 100 years old, that you love your customers, or that your astrological sign is Sagittarius.

So many presentations lead with facts and figures, trying to win with logic, features or benefits, keeping you in the “wants and needs” part of the brain. We now know real connection happens below that line, at the subconscious level.

 

#3 – Focus on Solving Pains and Eliminating Threats

Your prospect’s brain needs to hear how you’re solving its pain first. During your presentation, start by setting the pain and showing resolution. This is called driving emotional lift. That last movie or book you enjoyed? It was a great example of setting up a pain or threat and then giving you the same kind of emotional lift through its resolution.

Your presentation doesn’t need Hollywood special effects, but it can make the pitch better if you follow the formula. Each pain you address must be quickly countered with its resolution–your product or service. Then, back it up with solid proof. This engages the right part of the brain–the limbic brain–first, then gets the influencers–emotion and logic–to stop by and agree.

Win More Sales with A Better Pitch

You can’t show up and look the same, act the same, and say the same things as your competition and expect to close the sale. You have to win the brain to stand-out and differentiate and carry the room to close the deal. You can start winning more deals with sales presentations that actually engage your prospects and position you as the only solution.

Call to learn more

Chat Now

Follow Us

linkedinfacebook 

Source: https://blog.revenuepathgroup.com/blog/how-to-create-a-sales-pitch-that-closes-more-deals

Cold Calling Isn’t Dead, It’s Alive and Kicking Right?

Cold Calling ….

Just those two words together—cold calling—puts many people far away from warm and happy. Given that it’s so much fun for so many people, and that I have heard a number of times recently that the last nail has been banged into the cold calling coffin, why is cold calling still even on our radar screens?

Because it works.

“It doesn’t work,” you say? Well, in one sense I agree with you: there are a million ways to do it wrong and fail. Fail at something enough, and it’s easy to dismiss the whole tactic.

In fact, “Cold Calling is Dead” is one of the common myths in 5 Sales Prospecting Myths Debunked. (Download the full report for new data on the effectiveness of cold calling.)

Meanwhile, case study after case study confirms that cold calling can work. For example, I’ve seen cold calling work as a major part of a lead generation approach, yielding 6 clients in 6 months (a major acceleration of client additions), and increasing the pipeline by fivefold, for Deep Customer Connections, a management consulting firm in the insurance industry.

Making Ten Million Dollars

Many anti-cold-calling folks say, “There are so many powerful ways to build your client base, why even bother trying cold calling? You can give speeches. Publish articles and books. Work your network: it’s more extensive than you probably think.”

To paraphrase a famous business person (Comedian Steve Martin):

  • Question: What’s the secret to making ten million dollars?
  • Answer: First, start with nine million dollars.

Well, some people don’t write very well, they don’t have extensive networks, and speaking isn’t their bag. Some people can’t wait a year for a lead to materialize out of their writing or their network! If you can employ these tactics, great. It’s like starting with nine million. But regardless of whether you start with nine million or no million, cold calling still works.

What’s In It For Me (WIIFM)

Let’s assume you’re a Chief Strategy Officer at an $800 million dollar manufacturing firm in Ohio. Someone calls you and says, “My name is John Smith and I’m a change management consultant. Do you need change? Let’s meet.” Even if you’re headed to the vending machine, your immediate change needs probably won’t include John Smith.

But let’s say John calls and says, “My name is John Smith. The reason I’m calling is because my company, the ABC Consulting Group, has just recently conducted a major benchmark study on how manufacturing businesses—including Competitor 1 and Competitor 2 of yours—in the Midwest are succeeding with their labor unions in the face of global outsourcing. There are 3 practices that are working across the board and a few that fail most everyplace. If you’re interested, we’d be happy to come by and take you through the results.”

If this topic is on your mind, you might risk a 30-minute meeting to hear the results. Or you might have some questions right then and there. Either way, if I’m John, I’ve presented my cold “introduction” of myself and my company in a way that delivers value to you.

Will everyone take me up on this meeting? Of course not. But if my target list is well segmented and clean, a number of prospects will. When I get in front of them, the topic of conversation will be my recent research, work, and expertise—not a “get to know you and sell you” meeting.

A conversation about recent research is just one of many potential value propositions for the meeting. You might not want to present research because it might not be the best entry for you. But if you’re offering is worthwhile, a conversation with you should be able to offer something of strong value. (If you can’t figure out how you can deliver value in a conversation, find a new line of work.)

Regardless of the meeting premise, you have to handle the conversation well to get the best result from this meeting, but the ball is definitely in your court as to what happens from here on out.

 

How the Numbers Work

Answer the following question: If you get 10 meetings with 10 company leaders who have the right title, are in the right organization, and have the right criteria for being a good prospect for you, and you stay in touch with them fairly regularly in a meaningful way after the meeting, how many would become clients of yours in some capacity over the next year or two?

The most common answers I get for this question are “two or three” or “eight or nine”. Let’s assume you’re more modest, and the answer is two.

Next question: What does a bread-and-butter buyer represent to you in terms of revenue over the course of a year? It could be $7k, $70k, $170k, $700k, or anything. Let’s assume it’s $70k.

So, for the cost of setting up 10 meetings with prospects, whatever that cost is, the immediate return on your investment is $140k. This, of course, doesn’t take into account long term ROI factors such as repeat business and increased referrals.

The fallacy, in many cases, is that most sellers aren’t as good at closing as they think they are, and they don’t continue to stay in touch with the prospect regularly and meaningfully after they meet with them. But these factors don’t have anything to do with cold calling. They have to do with your ongoing nurturing, and the resources you devote to follow up. The cold calling part works fine for what it’s supposed to do: make an introduction with a prospective buyer that can lead to a good relationship. How you choose to build the relationship is a different matter.

Have Someone Else Call For You

Maybe you see the value and believe that cold calling can work, but you simply do not want to make the calls. You can have someone else call for you.

Reread the WIIFM section of this article above. In the beginning, you must be involved in targeting the right prospects, providing the strongest value proposition, and working with a telephone business developer to represent you clearly, strongly, and fairly. Then, let them go to work. Cold calling itself is not something that you, personally, need to get good at.

It’s been said that people make decisions with their hearts and justify them with their heads. People don’t want to make cold calls, and some don’t want to be associated with the method. So they figure out how to justify not employing cold calling, or why other things work better.

If you don’t want to make cold calls, don’t. But cold calling does work. Most people just do it wrong.

 

Click Here to learn more about website visitor tracking 

Call:805-222-6076 to learn more

Chat Now

Follow Us

linkedin facebook 

www.betterleadgen.com

Source: https://www.rainsalestraining.com/blog/cold-calling-works-you-just-do-it-wrong

 

One revenue growth tip for Sales Leaders that’s a real pay off

Uncover Qualified Leads

Sales are at the heart of every business, and when they are lackluster, it can spell disaster. Unfortunately, when many business owners see the numbers coming up short, they rely on flash-in-the-pan tactics like short-term incentives for salespeople, price reductions for customers, and sometimes just berating the sales team for non-delivery on goals. The problem with any of these techniques is that they are all bad for business. Incentives cost money and create only short-term boosts, if they work at all. Price reductions cut margins and diminish the value proposition of the product. And kicking the sales team when things are bad just demoralizes the staff and worsens their efforts. So what works? One thing–and every business owner can do it: monitoring sales calls.

Day 1. Start with an off-hours listen. If your company records calls, taking 1 hour to go back over calls from that day will show you how to put your sales back on course.  You will hear your sales reps using the wrong words, missing buying cues, giving customers incorrect information, and not asking for the sale. All of these things can be fixed, but only when they are discovered and taught around. Make a list of the issues and come in the next day and roleplay them with your team. Give them the words you want them to use, re-educate them on your product or service, and then practice questions they can use to close customers. Tell them that you will continue to take the time out of your day to listen because you know that together, you can drive sales.

Day 2. Live Listen to your Sales Reps calls. Choose 1 hour out of the day when your reps are generally busiest with sales calls.  Let your reps know that you will be spending time listening to their calls, because sales are the most crucial ingredient to making your company succeed. Make sure your reps feel that they have an important contribution to make. Then listen to calls as they happen. At first, don’t interrupt the call. Just take notes and give the rep the notes at the end of the call, and talk about what was done well, and where things could have been better. After a few calls, begin making suggestions during the call using a chat.  When a salesperson doesn’t pick up on a buying cue for example, point that out and include the phrase she should use to bring the customer to the close. As you help to bring a few calls to a sale, your sales rep will feel both the power of your suggestions, and understand that your monitoring is helpful rather than frightening.

Day 3. Ask your sales reps to monitor themselves.   At the end of the day, select 2-3 recordings and listen to them. Rather than telling the rep what to do differently on the call, ask questions to lead her to that knowledge herself. For instance, if a rep forgets to ask for the sale, you might say “can you listen to this call and tell me what words you used to see if the customer was ready to purchase?” As the rep answers, she will realize her omission, and remember to do it on the next call–because you have made her realize in an obvious but non-embarrassing way that her dialogue is missing something important. When she tells you that she did not make the ask, ask her how she thinks she might have done so. If needed, practice the word with her. Then encourage her to do it on every call for the next hour. It may be uncomfortable at first, but it will get easier with each call, and it will directly impact her success and your sales.

If you need sales and aren’t getting them, you have to get down in the trenches with your sales team and diagnose what’s happening. There is no substitute for it, and the person doing it should be the business owner rather than anyone else, because when the owner gets involved, everyone on staff understands that this issue is monumental, that it won’t go away, and that addressing it is a positive event, rather than a blame game. Yes, it takes time out of a business owner’s day,  and yes it can lead to scary and even painful discoveries, but ultimately, it is the quickest way to heal your sales and propel your company forward.

 

Source:https://www.inc.com/vanessa-merit-nornberg/got-3-days-make-more-sales-by-doing-this-alone.html?cid=search

 

 

 

The biggest misconception about email marketing in the US…

I have to opt in to receive B2B emails..

After sending hundreds of thousands of B2B emails we want to share the single most misunderstood part about email marketing, we hear it everyday. So, we want to clear it up and provide the actual rules for CAN SPAM Compliance, because, in reality businesses can send other businesses emails as long as they comply with the CAN SPAM rules.

Here are the CAN SPAM rules for the USA so you can be better informed…

Do you use email in your business? The CAN-SPAM Act, a law that sets the rules for commercial email, establishes requirements for commercial messages, gives recipients the right to have you stop emailing them, and spells out tough penalties for violations.

Despite its name, the CAN-SPAM Act doesn’t apply just to bulk email. It covers all commercial messages, which the law defines as “any electronic mail message the primary purpose of which is the commercial advertisement or promotion of a commercial product or service,” including email that promotes content on commercial websites. The law makes no exception for business-to-business email. That means all email – for example, a message to former customers announcing a new product line – must comply with the law.

Each separate email in violation of the CAN-SPAM Act is subject to penalties of up to $41,484, so non-compliance can be costly. But following the law isn’t complicated. Here’s a rundown of CAN-SPAM’s main requirements:

  1. Don’t use false or misleading header information. Your “From,” “To,” “Reply-To,” and routing information – including the originating domain name and email address – must be accurate and identify the person or business who initiated the message.
  2. Don’t use deceptive subject lines. The subject line must accurately reflect the content of the message.
  3. Identify the message as an ad. The law gives you a lot of leeway in how to do this, but you must disclose clearly and conspicuously that your message is an advertisement.
  4. Tell recipients where you’re located. Your message must include your valid physical postal address. This can be your current street address, a post office box you’ve registered with the U.S. Postal Service, or a private mailbox you’ve registered with a commercial mail receiving agency established under Postal Service regulations.
  5. Tell recipients how to opt out of receiving future email from you. Your message must include a clear and conspicuous explanation of how the recipient can opt out of getting email from you in the future. Craft the notice in a way that’s easy for an ordinary person to recognize, read, and understand. Creative use of type size, color, and location can improve clarity. Give a return email address or another easy Internet-based way to allow people to communicate their choice to you. You may create a menu to allow a recipient to opt out of certain types of messages, but you must include the option to stop all commercial messages from you. Make sure your spam filter doesn’t block these opt-out requests.
  6. Honor opt-out requests promptly. Any opt-out mechanism you offer must be able to process opt-out requests for at least 30 days after you send your message. You must honor a recipient’s opt-out request within 10 business days. You can’t charge a fee, require the recipient to give you any personally identifying information beyond an email address, or make the recipient take any step other than sending a reply email or visiting a single page on an Internet website as a condition for honoring an opt-out request. Once people have told you they don’t want to receive more messages from you, you can’t sell or transfer their email addresses, even in the form of a mailing list. The only exception is that you may transfer the addresses to a company you’ve hired to help you comply with the CAN-SPAM Act.
  7. Monitor what others are doing on your behalf. The law makes clear that even if you hire another company to handle your email marketing, you can’t contract away your legal responsibility to comply with the law. Both the company whose product is promoted in the message and the company that actually sends the message may be held legally responsible.

Source: https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/can-spam-act-compliance-guide-business

linkedin Follow Us